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Head bolt lube and sealants
#1
Head Bolt Set ES72892

Printed instruction in box says:

A. Bolts with pre-applied sealer on threads lubricate threads, and under every bolt head with oil and install as provided

B. Bolts without pre-applied sealer on bolt head or threds, lubricate threads and under every bolt head with oil and install as provided
** Diagram of cylinder head with bolt pattern numbered below.

I was confused for a minute. I was looking for A and/or B on the diagram. Than I noticed the printing should have simply and only stated 'lubricate threads, and under every both head with oil and install as provided.' 

Reading up on TTY bolts being installed with oil, anti-seize, assembly lube, or dry; It appears all these have different affect on clamp force.  There's even videos showing live tests of how bolts stretch in each method and how adding anything to threads, washers or bolt head will reduce 'clamping force'. A few places mentioned that manufactures of head bolts with have a chart showing the changes you need to do in torque and angle depending on if you install dry or with any of the mentioned lubricators.  Now the Haynes manual for this motor does not mention to oil/lube head bolts. Your instructions do, yet the torque and angle on both instructions are the same. Will oil reduce clamping force? How about Teflon paste?  I do have some ultra-torque fastener assembly lube. Would that need different torque/angle?
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#2
Hi Jerry,

First, can you tell us the instruction sheet number on what you have? It will be at the bottom and be an I-xxxx number.

Statement A needs to be corrected- if the bolts have pre-applied sealer, they do not need any lubricants applied to the threads. They do need oil under the bolt heads.

Bolts should not be installed dry, they need a little lubrication whether it comes from oil, a thread lubricant, thread locking compound or pre-applied sealer. They all help reduce friction so the correct clamping force from the fasteners can be achieved. The use of anti-seize or other super slippery lubricant affects the clamp load by over-torquing the fasteners. If one uses anti-seize or something similar, the installer needs to reduce the torque spec because of the reduction in friction.

When torque specs are given in manual, the lubricant or sealer is taken into account. A clicker torque wrench is "measuring" the amount of friction the bolt is experiencing when it is being tightened. Anything that affects that friction; lack of lubrication, wrong lubrication, bad or dirty threads, liquids in the bolt holes, etc. will change when the torque wrench clicks off.

The change to TTY bolts helps to take away some of the possible errors that can occur during a torque procedure. Besides taking away what is applied to the threads, TTY bolts takes away a torque wrench that is out or calibration and how well the installer is using the torque wrench. By that I mean, is the installer able to move the torque wrench in a smooth fashion, not in a jerky motion? Is the installer at a good angle when moving the torque wrench?

The initial torque on TTY bolts is low. It just seats the bolt & joint to a even starting point. By turning the TTY bolt to specific amount of degrees of rotation, it takes away some of the errors that can happen with a torque wrench. 90 degrees or whatever the spec may be is the same no matter what the friction, lubricant used, or torque wrench calibration is. That final amount of degrees is applying the maximum amount of clamp load to that joint.

We recommend that our TTY head bolts (or any bolt) have some oil applied to the threads & under the bolt head to be properly installed unless the bolt comes with pre-applied sealer or requires a thread locking compound applied to it. A reputable bolt manufacturers bolt lube is also acceptable. Stay away from anti-seize especially on head bolt use. Anti-seize is for use on bolts that see high temperature and corrosion conditions so they will come apart later without breaking the fastener.

We hope this helps!
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#3
At bottom it shows Form No. I-1946 (Rev. 02/10)
I wasn't going to point this out but there is another misprint. Last word of 'TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS:' says stemps instead of steps. Smile

"Stay away from anti-seize especially on head bolt use". That does have me concerned about this other brand of ultra-torque fastener assembly lube. In it's description it describes itself as "anti-wear and metal free anti-seize characteristics". Sounds like I should skip this and just use oil, and liquid teflon on bolts open to antifreeze.
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#4
Thanks for pointing that out! I forwarded that information on to the person who can fix that.

If it's ARP-brand lube it will be fine to use. The silver/copper/similar anti-seize are what you don't want to use on head fasteners.

We hope this helps!
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#5
Nice Info. Glad I found this thread.

I'm in the process of replacing head gaskets on my 1997 GM 3.1M engine. I just purchased this same head bolt set (ES 72892) & found the instructions confusing. I have the same exact  revision form that was posted. I was glad to see it was a misprint. I was beginning to get paranoid about this as the factory service manual states nothing about sealers and lubricants. If I believe my factory service manual, then these are not torque to yield bolts. Manual states to clean the threads of the bolts & holes then install. There is no mention about replacing the bolts or even lubricating them. Not lubricating them seems foolish. So confusing. 
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#6
(01-07-2017, 11:30 PM)Rich Wrote:  Nice Info. Glad I found this thread.

I'm in the process of replacing head gaskets on my 1997 GM 3.1M engine. I just purchased this same head bolt set (ES 72892) & found the instructions confusing. I have the same exact  revision form that was posted. I was glad to see it was a misprint. I was beginning to get paranoid about this as the factory service manual states nothing about sealers and lubricants. If I believe my factory service manual, then these are not torque to yield bolts. Manual states to clean the threads of the bolts & holes then install. There is no mention about replacing the bolts or even lubricating them. Not lubricating them seems foolish. So confusing. 

Hi Rich,

Lubrication by oil isn't required when a thread sealant is applied. In cases where head fasteners go into blind holes, the threads should be lightly oiled or a purpose-made bolt lubricant should be used. The thread sealant takes the place of oil for applications that require it.
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